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Ways to Give

  • Drop your check or cash in the offering plate on Sundays

  • Mail your check to:

      He's Alive Church

      1310 N Cannon Blvd

      Kannapolis, NC 28083

  • Give Online (one time gift or set up a recurring gift)

  • Text any amount to 84321

Complete the form to learn more about these ways to give or call the Church Office 980.781.4920:

  • Gifts of Stock (see info below)

  • Appreciated Securities (see info below)

  • From your Traditional IRA (see info below)

  • Corporate Matching

  • Legacy Giving

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GIVING APPRECIATED SECURITIES

 

Who is it for?

If you own publicly traded securities (stock or mutual funds), you have a perfect opportunity to give to your church and potentially reduce your federal income taxes.

 

How does it work?

  • You own publicly traded securities (stock or mutual funds) that have appreciated in value since purchase and have been held by you for more than one year.

  • You instruct your broker to transfer the shares directly to He's Alive Church, Fidelity Depository Trust Company (not to you). Provide the following information to your broker: Fidelity Depository Trust Company (DTC) Number 0226; He's Alive Church Account Number Z40-395357.

  • Once received by the church in their brokerage account, they are free to sell the shares and use the cash proceeds.

 

What are the benefits?

  • You receive a charitable tax deduction for the full fair market value of the securities on the date they are transferred to the church.

  • You avoid the capital gains tax on the appreciation in value of the shares since you have held them.

  • He's Alive Church receives the full value of the transferred shares for use in their programs.

 

Example

Mary Adams owns 100 shares of XYZ stock, a publicly traded company. She has held the shares for over eight years. Her cost basis in the stock is $10,000. Currently, the 100 XYZ shares have a fair market value of $20,000. If Mary were to sell the shares, she would incur a capital gains tax on the $10,000 of appreciation. Instead, Mary directs her broker to transfer the 100 shares of XYZ directly into her church’s brokerage account. Mary benefits by avoiding capital gains taxes on the $10,000 of appreciation, potentially saving her $1,500 in taxes (assumes 15% capital gains tax rate). In addition, Mary receives a charitable gift deduction for the full $20,000 value of the shares transferred. It is a classic win-win!

 

Keep in mind:

  • The strategy assumes that Mary has sufficient other deductions to exceed her standard deduction so that any charitable gifts are tax deductible to her.

  • For gifts of appreciated securities, Mary’s deduction will be limited to 30% of her adjusted gross income in the year of the gift. Excess deductions may be carried forward for five additional tax years.

  • If Mary has held the securities for less than one year, the strategy fails. If that were the case, Mary’s deduction would be limited to her cost basis in the stock.

Disclaimer: this outline provides merely a generalized summary of complicated tax issues. Prospective donors should not consider this summary as a substitute for careful individual tax planning and are urged to contact their own legal and tax advisors.

GIVING FROM YOUR TRADITIONAL IRA

 

Who is it for?

If you have a traditional IRA and are over age 70.5, you have a perfect opportunity to give to He's Alive Church and potentially reduce your federal income taxes. The strategy is known as a Qualified Charitable Distribution (QCD).

 

How does it work?

  • You determine the amount of your gift and have that distribution made from your IRA directly to He's Alive Church (not to you).

  • There is a limit of $100,000 per year per individual donor.

  • The transfer to the church counts toward your IRA Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) for that year.

  • The transfer does not generate taxable income or a charitable deduction.

 

What are the benefits?

  • Do not itemize your deductions, but instead take the standard deduction.

  • Pay income taxes on your Social Security benefit due to receiving an RMD.

  • Pay state income tax on IRA distributions but cannot deduct charitable gifts on your state return.

  • Encounter deduction limitations due to exceeding certain income thresholds

 

Example

John Smith, age 74, owns a traditional IRA currently worth $200,000. Because John is over age 72, he must take a Required Minimum Distribution this year of at least $7,843. John decides to make a gift of $20,000 to his church from his IRA. He directs his IRA custodian to transfer the $20,000 from his IRA directly to his church. John benefits as follows: he has satisfied his current year Required Minimum Distribution (RMD). The $20,000 distribution does not count as taxable income to John, thereby potentially avoiding increased taxation of his Social Security benefit. He may also have avoided higher taxes (surcharges) due to not breaching certain income thresholds. It’s a classic win/win! 

 

Keep in mind:

  • The strategy works only for Traditional IRA accounts, not Roth IRAs or 401(k) plans.

  • The strategy is available to anyone with an IRA over age 70.5 even though their RMD may not begin until age 72. In other words, people ages 70.5–71 can use the strategy. 

 

Disclaimer: this outline provides merely a generalized summary of complicated tax issues. Prospective donors should not consider this summary as a substitute for careful, individual tax planning and are urged to contact their own legal and tax advisors.

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